Hedda podcast: Performance agreements in higher education with dr Ben Jongbloed

Dr. Ben Jongbloed  (CHEPS)

Dr. Ben Jongbloed

Episode 48 of our podcast series features Dr. Ben Jongbloed (CHEPS, University of Twente). In the podcast, he discusses performance agreements in higher education. He gives the basic characteristics of performance agreements as a funding mechanism with respect to the main results from a recently completed CHEPS report for the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science. He reflects on the Dutch experiences with performance agreements, some of the impacts this far. He also shares his views on critical success factors for creating a well functioning performance agreement system.

Listen without the Flashplayer

You can download the CHEPS report “Performance-based funding and Performance Agreements in fourteen Higher Education Systems” here.

Dr. Ben Jongbloed is a senior research associate at CHEPS. He studied econometrics at the University of Groningen and completed a PhD at the University of Twente (on the modelling of government expenditure in a macro-econometric framework).

His main research interests are in the area of governance and resource allocation issues in higher education. He has also been involved in a number of European Commission projects, with focus on reforms in higher education, public-private partnerships, and the building of a classification of European higher education institutions (U-Map). For the European Commission he is currently working on the implementation of a multi-dimensional ranking of universities worldwide (U-Multirank) and on policies aimed at improving student completion in higher education.

Researcher position in Italy on higher education governance

downloadThe Scuola Normale Superiore announces a selection, based on work to date and interview, for a research contract under the following project: “Governance regimes and systemic performance in higher education”.

The successful candidate shall carry out research activities finalized to collect and to analyze quali-quantitative data on the reform of systemic governance in higher education in 15 EU countries, as pursued from the mid-1990s. The research shall use both quantitative and qualitative methods (especially QCA).

Applications are invited from candidates who have completed a PhD in Political Sciences, Sociology or Social Sciences.

  • Duration of contract: 2 years
  • Estimated starting of the activity: January 2016

Application deadline: the application must be received by 30th, November 2015 at the Scuola Normale.

Candidates are invited to read the official announcement published on the website of Scuola Normale Superiore, and follow instructions.


Guest blogger: The Bologna Process and its withering political salience

Jens Jungblut (UiO), Martina Vukasovic (UGent), Mari Elken (NIFU)

Jens Jungblut (UiO), Martina Vukasovic (UGent), Mari Elken (NIFU)

In this post, Jens Jungblut, Martina Vukasovic and Mari Elken examine the developments in the Bologna Process. In particular, focus is on the participation at the ministerial conferences and what these can tell us about the state of the Bologna Process.

Jens Jungblut works at the University of Oslo as a researcher and is a member of the ExCID research group, Martina Vukasovic is a post-doctoral researcher at CHEGG in Ghent University and Mari Elken is a researcher at NIFU. 

The ninth and latest ministerial conference of the Bologna Process earlier this year in Yerevan was one of these events where the European higher education community likes to celebrate itself for all of its achievements during the last 17 years of close policy coordination. This positive assessment was shared by most of the press reports that followed the meeting. Anne Corbett, for example, reported in the Times Higher Education that contrary to the “conventional wisdom” that the Bologna Process is no longer of interest for ministers and is left to technocrats and stakeholder organizations, the meeting in Yerevan was characterized by deft ministerial diplomacy, especially with regard to the admission of Belarus into the process.

This optimistic evaluation of the ministerial conference in specific and the political salience of the Bologna Process in general is somewhat contradicted by some of the reports that the different stakeholder organizations presented in Yerevan. While EUA’s TRENDS 2015 report  diplomatically highlights a growing importance of national policy-making in comparison to European-wide initiatives, ESU’s Bologna With Student Eyes 2015  openly warns about a growing lack of interest on the side of the national governments in the European Higher Education Area. (more…)

Call for contributors: Theory and method in higher education research

Photo: stock.xchng

Photo: stock.xchng

Do you feel you have a contribution to make for how theory and methods are used in higher education research?

The editors of the book series “Theory and Method in Higher Education Research”, Prof. Jeroen Huisman (Ghent University, Belgium) and Prof Malcolm Tight (Lancaster University, UK), are now seeking a few additional contributions to complete the 2016 volume.

The first two volumes of this series were published by Emerald in 2013 and 2014 as part of the series International Perspectives on Higher Education Research. Their success persuaded the publishers to start a separate series, Theory and Method in Higher Education Research, publishing one volume a year. The first volume of this series is now with the publishers and will come out later in 2015. The second volume is in the process of being put together for publication in 2016.

Expressions of interest in contributing a chapter should be emailed to both editors.

Deadline for abstracts, 30th of November.

Read more information here

Science4Refugees initiative

science4refugess_bannerRefugee situation is a topic gaining substantial amount in European societies at the moment. The need for solutions spans from the short term need to find accomodation and food, to more long term concerns.

The EU has launched an initiative to support those with academic backgrounds who now find themselves in a refugee situation. From the Science4Refugees website:

  • The European Commission has launched the Science4Refugees initiative to help refugee scientists and researchers find suitable jobs that both improve their own situation and put their skills and experience to good use in Europe’s research system.
  • Science4Refugees matches talented refugees and asylum seekers who have a scientific background with positions in universities and research institutions that are ‘refugee-welcoming organisations’ and that have suitable positions available, including internships and part-time and full-time jobs.
  • Science4Refugees is accessible to refugees and institutions through the EURAXESS – Researchers in Motion portal, a pan-European initiative providing access to a complete range of information and support services to researchers wishing to find jobs and pursue their research careers in Europe

If you are yourself, or know anyone with this background – sign up and enter the CVs to the EURAXESS portal, marking it with “Science4Refugees”.

Read more about he conditions and procedures for application here