Tag: students

Hedda podcast: Student engagement with knowledge as a means to define quality

Episode 44 of our podcast series features Dr. Paul Ashwin from Lancaster University in the UK. In the podcast we talk about student engagement with knowledge as a key feature of quality in higher education, and he reflects on some of the key results from a three year long study on pedagogical quality and inequality in the UK.

Listen without the Flashplayer

Click here to download the Policy makers guide (pdf) that the research team has prepared based on the project results. 

View also the publications that the podcast is referring to:

Dr. Paul Ashwin  (Lancaster University)

Dr. Paul Ashwin
(Lancaster University)

Dr. Paul Ashwin is employed as a Senior Lecturer and Head of Department at the Department of Educational Research at Lancaster University in the UK. Earlier he has worked at the Institute for the Advancement of University Learning, University of Oxford and Newham College of Further Education. His key research interests are related to the relations between teaching-learning and knowledge-curriculum practices in higher education, as well as the implications of this for both policy and practice. He has also a keen interest on the methodological development of higher education studies in this area.

Administrative support for internationalisation – mobility agreements and joint degree programmes

Kristi Barcus (Univeristy of Oslo, Hedda)

Kristi Barcus
(Univeristy of Oslo / Hedda)

In this entry, Hedda’s own Kristi Barcus (University of Oslo) shares her expertise about working with internationalisation within the study administration. While we often hear about the importance of internationalisation as a strategic objective for universities, an administrative perspective provides valuable insights into the specific measures that can be taken to assure that such policies are effectively put into practice. 

Since I started working at the University of Oslo in 2006, internationalization has become an ever increasing “hot topic”.  The university even dedicated an entire year to internationalization, calling 2012 “internationalization year”. UiOs Strategy 2020 has set a strong emphasis on internationalization both within its teaching and research activities. But what does internationalization mean to a study administrator and what are some ways in which administrators contribute to internationalization at universities?

Student Mobility

Working in study administration, internationalization is to a large extent linked to student mobility. During the recent SIU Internationalization conference in Trondheim the rector of the University of Bergen, Dag Rune Olsen, reflected on the importance of student mobility.  He said, “If a student doesn’t plan on studying aboard during their degree, maybe they should reevaluate their reason for studying. (own translation)” The idea that all students should spend time abroad during their studies is often a core aspect of internationalization policies at universities. The expectation that having an international dimension of a study program is valuable not only for the student and her future, but also to the university itself is an important factor. But how do you motivate students to study abroad? What can an administrator do to facilitate this?

Call for papers: 11th International Workshop on Higher Education Reform

HER2014The 11th International Workshop on Higher Education Reform will be held between August 25 to 27, 2014, at the Memorial University, St. John’s, in Newfoundland (Canada). This year, the key theme is focused on students. The key theme for the workshop is outlined as following:

Presentations are invited, and discussions will primarily focus, on themes related to reforms and innovations regarding accessibility and affordability of post-secondary studies, conditions and modes of learning, the transition from study to work, and, for adult students, the integration of higher education with other aspects of their professional, personal and civic life. As the relationship between HE and labor markets and employment systems is changing and the borders of HE expanding, there are many new institutional innovations, programs, forms of learning, and transition mechanisms and routes both into HE, from HE to the world of work, as well as from employment and domestic and civic duties back into HE.

Download the Call for Papers here (pdf) with extended information about the conference theme.

Papers and panels that address the above-mentioned and related themes are invited. Proposals for individual papers should not exceed 400 words, those for panels not 800 words in length.

  • Proposals should be submitted to the Organizing Committee before or on May 2nd, 2014.
  • Submissions can be made to HER2014@mi.mun.ca.
  • Details concerning communication, registration, accommodation, and the program can be found at the workshop website.

Wonder how the workshop is like? Read a review about the previous workshop in Ljubljana