Tag: academic seminar

Podcast: Horizontal governance and learning dynamics in higher education

We are pleased to share with you a presentation of some of the key messages from a large scale project “Horizontal governance and learning dynamics in higher education (HORIZON). The project is undertaken at the Faculty of Educational Sciences in University of Oslo.

In the presentation, Prof Peter Maassen, Prof Monika Nerland, dr. Jennifer Olson, dr. Hilde Afdal and dr Crina Damsa share their insights about he project. The seminar was recorded on 11th of February at the University of Melbourne.

Group presentation

Prof. Monika Nerland | Prof. Peter Maassen | Dr. Crina Damsa | Dr. Jennifer Olson | Dr. Hilde Afdal

 


Download the powerpoint slides for the presentation here

HORIZON project outline: 

The HORIZON project is aimed at contributing to an improved understanding of major change dynamics in higher education with respect to higher education governance and learning processes in higher education institutions, as well as the way these two are connected.




Seminar Recording on the Academic Profession in Chair and Department Systems

We are delighted to share with you another seminar recording from the research group HEIK (Higher Education: Institutional dynamics and Knowledge cultures). HEIK is a research group located at the Faculty of Educational Sciences in University of Oslo, the coordinating institution of Hedda.

Ester Höhle  (INCHER, University of Kassel)

Ester Höhle
(INCHER Kassel)

This time, we are pleased to feature Ester Höhle (INCHER Kassel, Germany) who gave a presentation titled: “The Academic Profession in Chair and Department Systems. An Empirical Analysis in Eleven European Countries

Listen without the Flashplayer

Abstract for the session: 
In Europe, different higher education systems co-exist simultaneously and make Europe an interesting research target. The focus of this paper is on whether chair systems and department systems as described by Clark (1983), Neave and Rhoades (1987) and Kreckel (2008) go hand in hand with specific patterns of the academic career. This question is treated empirically with the use of survey data from the international EUROAC project, where academics employed at universities were asked about their employment conditions, their career path, time use etc. and is supplemented with information from several country reports. The eleven European countries examined are Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Poland, the United Kingdom, Ireland, the Netherlands, Portugal, Italy, Finland and Norway.

First, the main features of the models are described followed by the categorization of the higher education system in each country in relation to the models. Second, the key features of academic career paths as they are realized in each country are discussed in terms of the predictions by the models. The analysis shows that the organizational structure of either chair or department does have a major impact on individual careers, barriers and chances and supports the description in six of the 11 countries precisely. In the other five countries (Italy, Portugal, Poland, Finland and Norway), however, at least two additional career patterns are observed that consist of a mixture of the predicted patterns. These are not well covered by the scholars’ descriptions and might require more detailed characterizations from current researchers.




Online seminar broadcast tomorrow: university mergers in Nordic countries

helsinkiInterested in themes related to mergers in the Nordic countries?

University of Helsinki is holding an open seminar on “Higher education and research in the Nordic academy – a beter future through mergers?”. The seminar will also be broadcasted online. There seminar includes two presentations and a panel discussion.

The event takes place Friday 31.10.14 at 10:30-12:00 Finnish time (09:30-11:00 CET). 

Presentation themes:

Dr. Romulo Pinheiro (Agder University, Norway): The last decade alone has seen considerable change in Norwegian higher education. Dr. Pinheiros’ presentation takes stock of the most important developments in the last decade, culminating with the October 2014 government announcement of a long-term strategy for higher education and research, with possible consequences on a number of fronts.

Dr. Lars Geschwind (Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan, Sweden): Presentation takes a closer look at the recent years’ policy development and examples of responses by Swedish higher education institutions.

Panel debate

After the presentations Dr. Leena Treuthardt (UNIFI), Dr. Marja Sutela(TAMK) and other speakers will join a panel discussion on Nordic higher education reforms and voluntary mergers. The event is part of a Network of Nordic Higher Education activity.

Please note that the event also marks the launching of the book “Higher Education and Research in Academe – Who should pay?”, edited by Prof. Timo Aarrevaara (University of Helsinki) and Prof Elisabeth Berg (Luleå Tekniska Universitet).

Follow the event through live webcast




Recorded seminar on the impact of learning outcome approaches within degree programmes

We are delighted to share with you another seminar recording from the research group HEIK (Higher Education: Institutional dynamics and Knowledge cultures). HEIK is a research group located at the Faculty of Educational Sciences in University of Oslo, the coordinating institution of Hedda.

Rachel Sweetman (HEIK/ Hedda) University of Oslo

Rachel Sweetman
(HEIK/ Hedda)
University of Oslo

This time, we are pleased to feature Rachel Sweetman from University of Oslo who gave a presentation titled: “The interpretation and impact of learning outcome approaches within degree programmes: national and disciplinary settings translating a key European concepts

Listen without the Flashplayer

Abstract for the session: 

Eight degree-programme cases from Norway and England, involving interviews with teachers, leaders and students, provide the basis for this comparative analysis of the way learning outcomes approaches are being interpreted within, and impacting on, diverse higher education settings.

Key variations and similarities in the interpretation and impact of learning outcome approaches as potential planning, teaching and steering tools are drawn out. These patterns are interrogated in relation to the ideas of policy translation and enactment. The variations that emerge are related to the distinct national settings of England and Norway, as well as aspects of disciplinary differences. The cases aim to support a wider discussion of the way enactment of learning outcome approaches so far relates to key theoretical distinctions and debates about outcome-based approaches, and the limitations of policies for standardization in international higher education.




HEIK seminar: Knowing and Living in Academia with Prof. Ulrike Felt

We are pleased to share yet another session from the HEIK academic seminar series in the field of higher education, with both invited international speakers and members of the research group HEIK (Higher Education: Institutional dynamics and Knowledge cultures) at the University of Oslo.

This lecture was recorded in May 2013 and features Professor Ulrike Felt from University of Vienna and the seminar is titled “Knowing and Living in Academia – conceptualising and examining new epistemic living spaces“.

Abstract for the session:

Over the last two decades numerous scholars have pointed to quite fundamental re-orderings taking place on the macro level of contemporary universities and research systems at large. These changes were captured by catchwords such as “Mode 1 vs Mode 2 knowledge production” (Gibbons et al., 1994), the “triple helix” (Etzkowitz and Leydesdorff, 2000) or “academic capitalism” (Slaughter and Leslie, 1997), mostly to diagnose the increasing inter-twinement of science with other societal actors and their rationales. While there has been a quite lively debate on whether or not these diagnoses are adequately supported by empirical evidence, whether they are descriptive or prescriptive, and whether they become self-fulfilling prophecies through their continuous re-performance, less reflection has been devoted to trace the effects of these claimed changes on students’ and researchers’ ways of knowing and living in their respective knowledge fields. Given the diversity and complexity related to living and knowing in research and universities, a rather differentiated analytical framing is needed to explore this issue further.