Category: Hedda News

Podcast: Quality Management of Norwegian Higher Education

Professor Peter Maassen

Professor Peter Maassen (University of Oslo)

We are pleased to share with you some of the recordings that were made during a seminar that was arranged on the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the Faculty of Educational Sciences at the University of Oslo. The presentations are made by members of the ExCID research group that focuses on studies of higher education and work, with particular emphasis on expert cultures and institutional dynamics.

The seminar recordings were made on 27th of September 2016.

In the following presentation, Peter Maassen presents key insights from recent projects on quality in higher education, titled: “Quality Management of Norwegian Higher Education: complexities and visions on possible future developments“. Before the presenration, professor Monika Nerland introduces the overall seminar.

Listen without the Flashplayer

View the powerpoint presentation for this seminar.

Stay tuned for more content from the seminar!




Hedda master programme in higher education – Global admission round now open!

So, are you curious about higher education as a research field? Have you worked in higher education and want to expand your competencies? Are you a former student politician who wants to study higher education further? Or perhaps you just think higher education a very fascinating field to study? Perhaps it is not you, but you know someone like this? Here is an opportunity!

The Faculty of Educational Sciences at the University of Oslo (Norway) is delighted to announce that the admission round for global applicants is now open and will close 1st of December 2016! For EEA and Nordic applicants, see deadlines below.

The two year research focused international programme is the first Master’s programme on higher education in Europe and one of the few in the world covering a broad range of disciplinary perspectives on higher education. The programme aims to educate candidates with a solid basis for analysing and critically assessing change processes at all relevant levels in higher education, and for understanding the management dimension in these processes.

Listen to the Director of Hedda, Professor Peter Maassen talk about the Master Programme:

Multidisciplinary programme

The programme is focused on changing functions, policies, and operations of Higher Education using an international and comparative perspective. The students receive a solid basis for analysing and critically assessing change processes at all relevant levels in higher education – from activities inside the classroom to understanding national and global developments.

International focus

Over the years, the programme has attracted students from more than 40 countries from the four corners of the globe, from Asia to Southern and Northern Europe, to Africa and the Americas. The diverse student group allows for sharing of experiences and knowledge of the higher education systems from various countries. Students get to learn from each other’s experience and go beyond the textbooks. This program is a unique opportunity to study in an international environment.

Research integration

The programme is research oriented and the students have the opportunity to have their master thesis integrated into research projects and learn first-hand skills of conducting research in a team.

Multiple career opportunities

Understanding the key institution of the knowledge economy – higher education – is a highly valued competence in the modern society. About 40% of the graduates continue onto a PhD, and the graduates of the programme are employed within higher education in various international and supranational organisations, such as the European University Association and the EU, ministries of education and national agencies, as well as university administrations around the world. You can view what some of the alumni say about the programme here.

Comments from our alumni

Read what our alumni has said about the programme: 




Invitation to participate in alumni study

hedda_logo_NY2010-v2Are you a graduate of the Hedda higher education Master Programme? Then keep on reading!

We are currently conducting an alumni survey of the Master’s program in Higher Education at the University of Oslo (including the HEEM Erasmus Mundus Program).

We would like to invite all alumni who haven’t participated yet and would like to thank those of you who have already taken the time to answer our questions. The survey is completely anonymous and will take about 10-15 minutes.

We are interested in finding out what career trajectories our graduates have followed both before and after enrollment in the program. With the help of your answers we also hope to get some insight into how we can strengthen our higher education community and how we can improve our program for our future students. All collected data will be treated confidentially and we will use your responses for nothing else but for our own research purposes.




Welcome new Hedda students!

A new year has started at the university, and Hedda has welcomed a new cohort of Master students, eager to start their interdisciplinary studies in the field of higher education. This year, the student cohort again includes  students from all over the world as usually is the case for the Hedda master programme.

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first information meeting with the new Hedda students in 2015

Getting to know new fellow Master students

Getting to know fellow Master students

This year we have some students who come from Norway locally, but also from a number countries in and around Europe (Austria, Germany, Greece, Norway Spain and Turkey), the African continent (Ethiopia, Ghana, Mozambique, Uganda), Asian countries (Nepal and South Korea) and the Americas (Canada, USA and Chile).

We are extremely happy to have this diverse student body also this year. This provides students wonderful opportunities for learning about higher education systems world wide. This gives a whole new meaning to studying different higher education models!

During the first information meeting the students met with the Hedda master programme staff and had great opportunities to mingle with their professors and lecturers afterwards.




Professor Monika Nerland received the faculty prize for excellent teaching

Congratulations to Professor Monika Nerland for being awarded the 2014 Best Teacher Award at the Faculty of Educational Sciences. She is a member of the research group ExCID at the Department of Education.

She is also one of the main professors in the Hedda master programme for higher education, teaching the modules on primary processes in higher education.

In the video, she shares her insights about what she considers excellent teaching in higher education.




Tips and Tricks: How to get started as a new master student? 16 top tips from a second year student!

Enzo Rossi  (Hedda master student)

Enzo Rossi
(Hedda master student)

Have you recently been admitted to the Hedda master programme in higher education? Wonder what to do next? Well, second year student Enzo Rossi shares his 16 top tips for a new student! While targeting new students at the Hedda master programme, these tips are of relevance also for others who might be starting their studies as international students. 

So, you got accepted to the Mphil in Higher Education at the University of Oslo! If you are a bit like I was when accepted, you are probably freaking out right now. So to help you freak out a little bit less, I thought about some things you might find helpful to know before you start.

1) Congratulations! You should pat yourself in the back (or get someone else to do it for you) Around 300 people applied to this programme, and less than 30 typically get accepted, so you should be very happy to be counted amongst the chosen ones.

2) You are going to look at the syllabus and think “I have no idea what any of these things mean”. The first course is an introduction, so all will be clear and it would build up a good base for the rest of the course. Second year students will be assigned to have “colloquiums” with you, where they will go over what you have learned and answer questions you may have and help you link concepts.

3) PANIC, the first semester is very intensive, and even though there are gaps in between lessons, you will use that as valuable study time. The following semester is not as heavy.

4) Yes, you will find a job after you graduate. Coming from business, I was a bit worried about my career opportunities after graduation, but turns out that there are many opportunities for Higher Education graduates. Look at the alumni profiles on the Hedda blog for some examples.

5) Prepare to be challenged. You know all those things you knew about how Universities worked? That amazing knowledge you had from being a student representative? Prepare to see it crushed. It’s all gonna be super useful, but you will find yourself re-thinking a lot of conceptions you had. You will hear from your classmates about how things work in their countries and academics that will challenge what you thought was written in stone with hard evidence. But that’s all part of the charm.




Hedda Master Programme in Higher Education: European and Nordic admission round!

We are delighted to inform you that the application round for European and Nordic countries is now on its way!

Are you interested in knowing more about the role of higher education in modern knowledge society and how it operates? The Faculty of Education at the University of Oslo (Norway) is proud to offer an award winning 2-year Master of Philosophy Programme in Higher Education.

The two year research focused international programme is the first Master’s programme on higher education in Europe and one of the few in the world covering a broad range of disciplinary perspectives on higher education.

Listen to the Director of Hedda, Professor Peter Maassen talk about the Master Programme:

Or, view two of our students sharing their views of the field and the Master Programme after completing the first semester of the programme.

Multidisciplinary programme

The programme is focused on changing functions, policies, and operations of Higher Education using an international and comparative perspective. The students receive a solid basis for analysing and critically assessing change processes at all relevant levels in higher education – from activities inside the classroom to understanding national and global developments.

International focus

The student body and staff are highly international. The programme has had students from more than forty countries in the world, including faraway places such as Maldives and Vanuatu, as well as USA, China, Brazil, UK, Australia and various European countries. 
In addition, the students have an opportunity to spend parts of their studies in partner institutions abroad.

Innovative and high quality learning environment

The programme features lectures from highly renowned researchers from across the world and is based on multi-faceted modes of delivery and supported by a state of the art e-learning platform. 
In 2009, the Master of Philosophy in Higher Education programme was awarded the prize as the best learning environment at the University of Oslo.

Research integration

The programme is research oriented and the students have the opportunity to have their master thesis integrated into larger research projects and learn first-hand skills of conducting research in a team.

Master Programme Brochure (pdf)

Master Programme Brochure (pdf)

Multiple career opportunities

Understanding the key institution of the knowledge economy – higher education – is a highly valued competence in the modern society. About 40% of the graduates continue onto a PhD, and the graduates of the programme are employed within higher education in various international and supranational organisations, such as the European University Association and the EU, ministries of education and national agencies, as well as university administrations around the world.

Comments from our alumni

Here is what our alumni says!




Summing up – 2014 in review

20142First of all – happy new year, everyone! We would like to wish all of Hedda friends a successful and joyful 2015! 

A new year is also a time to look back at the year that has passed here on the Hedda blog, and as you can see – what a year it has been! Browse this through to make sure you did not miss out on some of the highlights!

Hedda 3.0 and other Hedda news

First big news early 2014 was upgrading the site, much anticipated and a major upgrade since 2010 when the page was last redesigned. The new version included optimization for different media and devices, cleaner page structure, post navigation and other nice tweaking. Having worked on the new layout for a year now, this sure was needed! We will of course continue to work on the site further, also through 2015! We also reached new milestones for followers on Facebook and Twitter – and are now fast closing in on 1000 Hedda friends on Facebook! 

We welcomed a new cohort of students (always wonderful!), who went to the Scavanger hunt and pizza night (with a wonderful winning contribution highlighted here!)

Furthermore, great news about Hedda students – Erin Nordal was elected as the vice-chairman of ESU – the European Student Union that represents about 20 million students in Europe. On that occasion, we also asked her some questions about the new position and her thoughts on higher education in Europe.

Podcasts

First of all – we celebrated 5 years of Hedda podcast in 2014! On this occasion, we did a number of things – we interviewed Hedda director Peter Maassen, we asked some Hedda friends about their favourite podcasts – and we revealed the ten most popular Hedda podcasts over time! Curious? Check out he post here! Furthermore to celebrate the anniversary, we did some digging about the origins, so Shane Colvin and Leasa Weimer shared their insights.

As always, there were also a number of podcasts produced in 2014. Dr. Paul Ashwin discussed results from a recent major project on student engagement – and he highlighted this as an important means to define quality. Students were also the topic for another one of the podcasts, with Dr. Manja Klemencic – where we discussed student engagement as a research theme from multiple perspectives. In a sense, Johann Mouton also focused on a student perspective – while focusing on PhD education, and further linking this to scientific growth in Africa. On a slightly different topic, Dr. Martina Vukasovic shared her thoughts on higher education transformation in the Western Balkans.

Guest and student bloggers


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Holiday greetings from Hedda!

heddasnowrandomDear Hedda friends across the globe!

We are incredibly thankful that you have taken the time to stop by to read some of the guest posts, listen to podcasts, consider some of the opportunities in the world of higher education. We are also immensely indebted to all of our fabulous guest contributors in 2014 – thank you so much for using some of your time for Hedda. 

Just before new year, we shall also summarise the year of 2014 in review – writing up all the highlights that have been on the blog 2014. So if you think you might have missed out on something – this is your chance to catch up! 

Again – thank you so much for 2014, and looking forward to an equally wonderful 2015! Happy holidays from all of us! 



Tips and Tricks: How to complete your Master thesis?


higher-educationSpring semester is arriving soon, and many Master students are now embarking on their path to finish their Master thesis. Starting that journey might seem like a journey to the unknown… How to manage this? 

So, to ease the process, we have compiled a set of practical tips for you to think about.

Do you have some more tips to share? Please do so in the comments! 

Have a clear research focus

Sure, you might need to polish the questions later, but research questions keep you in focus throughout the thesis. Make sure that they are appropriate for your topic and reflect what it is that you want to know.

Check your methods course books about how to formulate questions and examine your questions critically. Is there a normative assumption in the question? Is it a yes and no question? What kind of data do I need to answer this question and will I be able to get this data? Are there more than one questions in the question? Is this question researchable?

It is rather peculiar how easy it is to become “blind” about your own questions and not notice even things such as asking yes and no questions, or that the questions are too broad or have a normative assumption.

Aside feedback from a supervisor, a useful means to work with research questions is to discuss with your fellow students. Do they understand your questions? Can you understand theirs?

Be realistic

Your master thesis is not the last thing you will ever write, and it is definitely not your life work. So keep your thesis focused and do not add new questions over time. More topics mean that you have less space for each topic.

Keep your thesis focused. Here is a humorous illustration of the PhD that is also relevant for your Master thesis. It is quite natural that your thesis focus is on a tiny part of a big field of higher education and even bigger world beyond. This does not mean that it would not be a worthy contribution.

Do not get distracted by other topics that are also interesting and almost relevant. If research is something for you, you can pursue these topics later in your career. Writing your Master thesis is just a first step in your further career.