Category: Conferences and Seminars

Call for papers: Second International Conference on Cultural Political Economy

culturaleconomyconference

The Second International Conference on Cultural Political Economy is hosted by the Centre for Globalisation, Education and Social Futures at the University of Bristol.

Theme for the conference: “Putting culture in its place in political economy”. The conference will focus on themes in inter‐ and trans‐disciplinary social sciences, approaching Cultural Political Economy as analytical resource. It will look to further develop the Cultural Political Economy conceptualisations and it is particularly interested in ‘the cultural’ in relation to ‘the political’ and ‘the economic’

The organisers are in particular focused on the concept of Cultural Political Economy (CPE), defined as following: “Cultural Political Economy (CPE) is an emerging and still developing trans‐disciplinary approach oriented to post‐disciplinary horizons. It can be understood as a trans‐ and post‐disciplinary research paradigm that can used to study a wide range of phenomenon. What makes it distinct and new is that it is concerned with making ‘cultural turns’ in the study of political economy. It does so to enhance its interpretive and explanatory power. It takes into account that the economic and political spheres are always‐already cultural and that taking this into account transforms the study of political economy and cognate fields.”

Key dates: 

– abstract submission deadline: 29 April 2016
– notification of abstract acceptance: 27 May 201
– registration opens: 27 May 2016
– registration closes: 27 July 2016
– full paper submission (of selected abstracts): 27 July 2016
– conference: 25-26 August 2016

Read more here on the conference website




Call for papers: University futures conference

unikeThe conference “University futures” is arranged as a part of the UNIKE project. The conference is held June 15 – 17 2016, at the Danish School of Education, University of Aarhus, Copenhagen Campus in Denmark.

The main focus of the conference is following: How is a wide range of businesses and other stakeholders engaging with and reassembling the university? What is meant by internationalisation? Must it only be a strategic aim or can it be a participatory process? How are universities mobilised by nations and regions in the global knowledge economy? How can ideas from feminism and post-capitalism be used to create a liveable university? What would it mean to have an open system of higher education? Are there alternative ways of organising the university and its relations with society? 

Interested in submitting a paper? The call of papers can be found below.

Call for papers:




Call for papers: Politics of higher education, research and innovation section at ECPR 2016

one of the panels at the section for Knowledge policies at the 2015 ECPR conference in Montreal

The section for Knowledge policies at the 2015 ECPR conference in Montreal

The ECPR conference has for several years had a successful section on Europe of Knowledge (for instance, read reviews on the 2014, 2013 and 2011 conferences). This year, the section has been widened in relation to the proposed Standing Group on knowledge politics. Below is the global call for papers for the section at ECPR 2016 conference.

This is a global call for the ECPR 2016 ‘Politics of Higher Education, Research, and Innovation’ section (formerly Europe of Knowledge) endorsed by the proposed Standing Group of the same name.The ECPR General Conference will be held on 7-10 September 2016 in Prague, Czech Republic.

You will find below the section abstract along with short panel abstracts and the contact details of the panel organisers. Extended CFPs for each panel will be circulated and posted on the CRN’s site in the coming weeks.

If you are interested in submitting a paper to one of these panels please contact the panel chair(s) directly (contacts are below) to discuss your ideas before the 24th of January 2016 or submit an abstract independently to the section before the formal deadline (15 February 2016) via MyECPR. Please note that ECPR only allows individuals to perform each conference function (including paper presenter) once within the academic programme, though multiple co-authorship is possible.

Section description: Knowledge policies are at the forefront of contemporary global politics and are seen as the foundation on which societies coalesce and economies thrive. This section builds on the previous four sections on the Europe of Knowledge and invites contributions from around the world to consider the various dimensions of knowledge policy development. Specifically, we are interested in theoretical, empirical, and comparative contributions that investigate the role of the ‘four I’s’ – ideas, interests, instruments and institutions – in the global, multi-level, multi-issue, and multi-actor governance of knowledge policies, including failures and successes. By ‘role’, we refer to effects that ideas, actors (individual, organisational), policy instruments/mixes, and institutions have had on the governance of knowledge policies, and vice-versa. We focus on ‘roles’ to enable a multidisciplinary discussion on whether these factors share defining characteristics across different knowledge policy domains (i.e. research, higher education, and innovation), and between distinct governance levels and geographical regions. This section continues to welcome scholars from all theoretical and methodological approaches to critically discuss the reconfiguration of knowledge systems around the world.




Call for papers: Complexity and the politics of knowledge policies

IPPAHKThe 2016 HKU-USC-IPPA Conference on Public Policy will be held 10-11 June 2016 in Hong Kong.

The theme is titled “Coping with Policy Complexity in the Globalized World”. The conference includes also a panel on knowledge policies. Interested? Deadline for paper proposals is 30th of January 2016, and the call for papers for this panel is outlined below:

T03P05: “Complexity and the politics of knowledge policies: multi-issue, multi-level and multi-actor”

The complexity of policy processes and the relationship between instrument choice and impact have always intrigued scholars of politics, public policy, and public administration. Indeed, complexity constitutes a key element in established public policy theoretical frameworks such as punctuated equilibrium, multiple streams, and is at the core of Lindblom’s science of ‘muddling through’. In recent years, policy scholars such as Cairney and Geyer have pushed for embracing complexity as a foundation and starting point for policy analysis. These scholars advocate a ‘complexity theory’ approach that enables researchers to attend to both top-down as well as bottom-up dynamics, interests and behaviour of various actors, and how policy ideas, goals and instruments are interpreted and transformed during the policy process.




Call for papers: inequalities of access to higher education

sciencespo-lieppSiences Po – LIEPP is organising a conference themed “Inequalities of access to higher education: the role of policies, institutions and markets“. The conference takes place in Paris, October 8-9, 2015. The conference language is English.

The conference is a follow-up to the research project “Transition to higher education in France: the role of networks, institutions and markets” funded by LIEPP (Laboratory for the Interdisciplinary Evaluation of Public Policies) in 2013-2015.

From the call of papers: “While the conference welcomes contributions that describe existing inequalities on the basis of social class, ethnicity, gender and age, and especially how these different factors interact with each other, the focus is, more specifically, on the ways in which policies, institutions and markets influence the shape and extent of access inequalities. Each of these dimensions, which constitute the sub-themes of the conference, can be treated separately or simultaneously. Contributors might focus on a specific level (macro, meso or micro) or on their interrelation, on a single set of actors (policy-makers, secondary or higher education administrators, professors or counsellors, market professionals, students and parents…) or on their interaction and on various types of schemes, devices, processes and practices. Statistical and qualitative as well as mixed-methods studies are equally welcome. Cross-country comparisons are encouraged but proposals can focus on specific countries and localities if they show awareness of global dynamics and/or processes in other national settings.”