Category: Resources and Info

Podcast: University Civic Engagement – What Does It Mean To Be An Engaged University?

The recording was made during a seminar organized by the research group ExCID (Expert cultures and institutional dynamics: Studies in higher education and work) at University of Oslo. The ExCID group is focused on theoretical, methodological, and empirical understanding of the dynamics of higher education and its way of fostering academic and professional development. The seminar was held 15th of November 2016.

University Civic Engagement: What Does It Mean To Be An Engaged University?

Presenter: Dr. Bojana Culum (University of Rijeka, Croatia)

Bojana Culum (University of Rijeka, Croatia)

Bojana Culum
(University of Rijeka, Croatia)

Abstract for the seminar:

Civic engagement refers to the ways in which citizens participate in the life of a community in order to improve conditions for others or to help shape the community’s (better) future, through both political and non-political processes. Civic engagement is considered to be central to the public purpose of higher education and essential to the student experience, empowering students to become active and socially responsible citizens in a democratic society. However, in the context of major societal changes and challenges, it is argued that publicly-funded universities have to move beyond creating such engaged experiences only for students and that they have a civic duty to engage with wider society on the local, national and global scales, and to do so in a manner which links the social to the economic spheres. There are many ways to live our commitment to community and civic engagement, from big impacts to small decisions. This seminar will reflect on research in the field as well as critics and serve as a platform for discussion on what does it mean for contemporary universities to embrace civic engagement and become active and socially responsible institutional citizen(s) and caring (institutional) neighbours – how to foster meaningful connections and engagement between universities and communities to effect positive change in society.

Bojana Culum works as assistant professor at the University of Rijeka’s Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy, Croatia. Her research focuses on university third and civic mission, university civic and community engagement (the concept of an engaged university) and changes in academic profession with particular interest for early career (female) researchers’ socialisation into academia. She was a Fulbright Visiting Scholar at Portland State University, USA, during the academic year 2015/2016.

Listen without the Flashplayer

View the slides of the presentation here. 


The recording has been reposted with permission from the research group.

View the research group homepage here.




List of conferences relevant for higher education in 2017

2017 coming up – what are your conference plans for the coming year? Calls for papers have been distributed and dates are confirmed. So time to start planning which conferences to attend in 2017. To make this easier for you, we are now compiling a list of relevant conferences for the fourth year now!

Remember, always double check with the conference websites for the dates or changes in deadlines, extensions and so forth. We still hope this can be a useful resource to plan your calendar for next year.

We have listed the conferences first as specific higher education conferences and then other disciplinary conferences that would likely be relevant for higher education researchers. The conferences are listed alphabetically in their respective sections. Where we have such reviews, we have also added a link to Hedda reviews from these conferences, to give some insight for how these conferences are like – just to make your selection process a little easier!

Again, if you have some to add – leave a comment and we add it to the list!

(Bi)Annual conferences




National systems for student fees and support systems in Europe – Eurydice report

Eurydice has published a report that looks into student fees and support systems across Europe for 2016/2017 study year. The report provides an overview of key developments in Europe in this area, as well as more detailed national case studies.

Tuition fees and student support are a national issue, but under EU legislation, countries must accept other EU national on same terms as own nationals. However, behind this main logic the content of student fees and student support includes a multitude of practices. Furthermore, the report highlights that there is a significant difference in the amount of public funding provided (see also EUAs Public Funding Observatory for more information).

The data shows that there are four countries with no fees for students, and twelve countries that have universal fees. The report also analyses the relationship between fees and support, arguing that relationship to be crucial in understanding the reality students are facing. Countries are divided into four specific types, distinguishing between high and low (or no) share of fee paying students in the system, and high and low share of those getting grants. 




Podcast: Academic developers and quality management with Ester Fremstad and Tone Solbrekke

excid_logoWe are pleased to share with you some of the recordings that were made during a seminar that was arranged on the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the Faculty of Educational Sciences at the University of Oslo.

The presentations are made by members of the ExCID research group that focuses on studies of higher education and work, with particular emphasis on expert cultures and institutional dynamics.

The seminar recordings were made on 27th of September 2016.

In this presetation, Dr. Ester Fremstad and Prof. Tone Solbrekke present their ongoing study on academic development: Academic developers and quality management: perspectives from institutional leaders

Listen without the Flashplayer

View the powerpoint presentation for this seminar.

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View also the presentation by Peter Maassen on quality management in higher education. Stay tuned for even more content from the seminar!




Podcast: Quality Management of Norwegian Higher Education

Professor Peter Maassen

Professor Peter Maassen (University of Oslo)

We are pleased to share with you some of the recordings that were made during a seminar that was arranged on the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the Faculty of Educational Sciences at the University of Oslo. The presentations are made by members of the ExCID research group that focuses on studies of higher education and work, with particular emphasis on expert cultures and institutional dynamics.

The seminar recordings were made on 27th of September 2016.

In the following presentation, Peter Maassen presents key insights from recent projects on quality in higher education, titled: “Quality Management of Norwegian Higher Education: complexities and visions on possible future developments“. Before the presenration, professor Monika Nerland introduces the overall seminar.

Listen without the Flashplayer

View the powerpoint presentation for this seminar.

Stay tuned for more content from the seminar!




New open access book: Simon Marginson on the crisis of the California master plan

The California master plan has been an inspiration in the world of higher education. Introduced in the 1960s it market an important milestone in thinking about system coordination in higher education. However – what has happened to the plan since?

clipboard02In a new book, professor Simon Marginson looks into the development of the plan and its spread across the world. Simon Marginson is the Director of the UCL Institute of Education (IOE) Centre for Global Higher Education, and leads CGHE’s global higher education engagement research programme.

Marginson explains his main rationale for the book: “In this book I start from the legacy of Clark Kerr and the 1960 Master Plan for Higher Education in California, noting the strengths and weaknesses of that framework, and then reflect on the spread of the Californian ‘Multiversity’, and the influence of the system model, throughout the world, especially in East Asia“.

In the book, he also takes a more critical stance towards the recent developments in American higher education, as Marginson argues: “The final 40 per cent of the book then attempts to explain the gathering and growing difficulties faced by public higher education in America, in the context of an increasingly unequal economy and society. The conclusion suggests ways forward for the future.

The book is available open access, which is arguably still (too) rare in the field of higher education for books. Marginson explains his rationale for choosing open access: “I am very impressed by the scholarly virtues of open access publishing of a scholarly book, which University of California Press (in line with their own public values which can be traced back to the 1960s) are increasingly using. It’s good to be able to spread the work more widely than with solely purchased books.

Download the book

Marginson, S. (2016) – The Dream is Over: The crisis of Clark Kerr’s California Idea of higher education. Published by University of California Press, download free at doi: http://doi.org/10.1525/luminos.17




List of conferences relevant for higher education in 2016

2015-08-29 12.39.34

ECPR 2015

So, the new year is approaching in full speed. Have you made your plans for 2016 yet?

Calls for papers have been distributed and dates are confirmed. So time to start planning which conferences to attend in 2016. To make this easier, we are now compiling a list of relevant conferences for the third year in a row!

Remember, always double check with the conference websites for changes in deadlines, extensions and so forth. We still hope this can be a useful resource to plan your calendar for next year.

We have listed the conferences first as specific higher education conferences and then other disciplinary conferences that would likely be relevant for higher education researchers. The conferences are listed alphabetically in their respective sections.

Where we have such reviews, we have also added a link to Hedda reviews from these conferences, to give some insight for how these conferences are like – just to make your selection process a little easier!

Again, if you have some to add – leave a comment and we add it to the list! 

update: VIEW THE LIST FOR 2017 WITH UPDATED DEADLINES




Tips and Tricks: How to get started as a new master student? 16 top tips from a second year student!

Enzo Rossi  (Hedda master student)

Enzo Rossi
(Hedda master student)

Have you recently been admitted to the Hedda master programme in higher education? Wonder what to do next? Well, second year student Enzo Rossi shares his 16 top tips for a new student! While targeting new students at the Hedda master programme, these tips are of relevance also for others who might be starting their studies as international students. 

So, you got accepted to the Mphil in Higher Education at the University of Oslo! If you are a bit like I was when accepted, you are probably freaking out right now. So to help you freak out a little bit less, I thought about some things you might find helpful to know before you start.

1) Congratulations! You should pat yourself in the back (or get someone else to do it for you) Around 300 people applied to this programme, and less than 30 typically get accepted, so you should be very happy to be counted amongst the chosen ones.

2) You are going to look at the syllabus and think “I have no idea what any of these things mean”. The first course is an introduction, so all will be clear and it would build up a good base for the rest of the course. Second year students will be assigned to have “colloquiums” with you, where they will go over what you have learned and answer questions you may have and help you link concepts.

3) PANIC, the first semester is very intensive, and even though there are gaps in between lessons, you will use that as valuable study time. The following semester is not as heavy.

4) Yes, you will find a job after you graduate. Coming from business, I was a bit worried about my career opportunities after graduation, but turns out that there are many opportunities for Higher Education graduates. Look at the alumni profiles on the Hedda blog for some examples.

5) Prepare to be challenged. You know all those things you knew about how Universities worked? That amazing knowledge you had from being a student representative? Prepare to see it crushed. It’s all gonna be super useful, but you will find yourself re-thinking a lot of conceptions you had. You will hear from your classmates about how things work in their countries and academics that will challenge what you thought was written in stone with hard evidence. But that’s all part of the charm.




Podcast: The Governance Paradox. Enduring and emerging tensions in the governance of universities

Prof Peter Maassen and Prof Bjørn Stensaker

Prof Peter Maassen and Prof Bjørn Stensaker

We are pleased to share with you a presentation of some of the key messages from a large scale project “European Flagship Universities; balancing academic excellence and socio-economic relevance (FLAGSHIP)The project is undertaken at the University of Oslo with partners at Universities of Twente, Aarhus and Helsinki, as well as LH Martin Institute at University of Melbourne

In the presentation, Prof Peter Maassen and Prof Bjørn Stensaker a share their insights about he project.

The seminar was recorded on 12th of February at the University of Melbourne.


Download the Powerpoint slides for the presentation here

FLAGSHIP project outline: 

FLAGSHIP examines the ways in which European flagship universities have adapted over the last ten years to far-reaching changes in their political and socio-economic environments, and the extent to which these adaptations are initiated and implemented by the institutional leadership or as a consequence of external change drivers.

A ‘FLAGSHIP’ university is defined as a comprehensive research-intensive university, located in one of its country’s largest urban areas. A FLAGSHIP university is in general among the oldest and largest institutions for higher learning of its country. 



Podcast: Horizontal governance and learning dynamics in higher education

We are pleased to share with you a presentation of some of the key messages from a large scale project “Horizontal governance and learning dynamics in higher education (HORIZON). The project is undertaken at the Faculty of Educational Sciences in University of Oslo.

In the presentation, Prof Peter Maassen, Prof Monika Nerland, dr. Jennifer Olson, dr. Hilde Afdal and dr Crina Damsa share their insights about he project. The seminar was recorded on 11th of February at the University of Melbourne.

Group presentation

Prof. Monika Nerland | Prof. Peter Maassen | Dr. Crina Damsa | Dr. Jennifer Olson | Dr. Hilde Afdal

 

Download the powerpoint slides for the presentation here

HORIZON project outline: 

The HORIZON project is aimed at contributing to an improved understanding of major change dynamics in higher education with respect to higher education governance and learning processes in higher education institutions, as well as the way these two are connected.